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Astrology and Culture

Astrology and Culture

Until the 17th century, astrology was an integral part of Western culture. In India, it still is. You will find references to astrological symbolism in literature, art, music and other cultural expressions. In several of his plays, Shakespeare used astrological descriptions as a short-hand description of the personality and attitudes of his characters. The artists of the Renaissance used astrological symbolism in their paintings, sculptures and in the stained glass windows of churches. We still refer to people as firey, airy, and earthy. It is interesting that wetness has not retained a similar adjectival role. And even though astrology is decried in public on a regular basis, nearly all newspapers and magazines still have the horoscope column and polls continue to show that 25% - 30% of people believe astrology can work.

If you believe psychology is a merely a modern invention of a narcissistic age, you haven’t been paying attention. While the “scientific” study of psychology in a laboratory may be a relatively modern notion, (re)invented by researchers in the 19th and early 20th centuries, the study of the mind has ancient roots in all human cultures.  The Hellenistic world that gave rise to astrology (in the form we know and love) is no exception. In fact, many of the concepts we think of as part of the modern study of psychology have deep roots in the Hellenistic world.

Index

Over the past few decades, “chaos theory” and “complexity theory” have emerged as new scientific models for understanding chaotic and/or complex systems. Chaos theory has grown out of physics and mathematics. Complexity theory has developed mainly from studying biological and human systems. These theories share a natural alignment with the spirit and practice of astrology, more so than other attempts to use astrology with the concepts of modern science. The current configuration of Uranus and Pluto makes this an auspicious time to discuss chaos and complexity theory with astrologers.
The seeds of future events are carried within ourselves. They are implicit in us and unfold according to the laws of their own nature. -- Lawrence Durrell, The Alexandria Quartet: Cleo -- Increasing numbers of people now are using astrology to better understand themselves and their relationships, their place in the world, their deep inner self and their ancestral legacy through family dynamics. Typically, a client does want to maximize their potential and realize their goals, but most importantly, they want to know what is going to happen to them and when. To what degree can astrology address these natural…
A fabulous moment in history -- Earthlings have gone to Pluto! For the first time ever, after a journey of more than 3 billion miles and 9 years, a human-made spacecraft buzzed by Pluto within just 7,800 miles of the surface on July 14, 2015. And we all know astrologers LOVE Pluto! (Or are just too intimidated to say otherwise.) In any case, we at least love to talk about him. So, to celebrate this historic event, Kepler College hosted its own Pluto Flyby Party on July 14. If you missed the live event, view the recording!
Attempts to translate astrological symbolism into forms acceptable to Christians began in the early centuries of the Christian era.[1]  Leonardo Da Vinci painted his work “The Last Supper” in a time when correspondences between apostles and zodiac signs had been in circulation for well over a thousand years. [2]  (See Walter C. Cambra’s article “The Zodiacal Template” showing Dante’s subtle yet methodical incorporation of the zodiacal wheel into his work The Divine Comedy) A careful viewing of “The Last Supper” shows six apostles flanking each of Jesus’ right and left sides.  These twelve apostles are distinctly presented in groups of three. …