The roots of Western astrology can be traced back to the ancient people of Mesopotamia; the most detailed, surviving records of the origins of astrology are found in the archaeological remains of the ancient cities of Babylonia. Some of the oldest recorded astrological tablets date back to Babylonian civilization from 2400 BCE.[1] Records show this region settled as early as 4000 BCE and growing into the cultural region known as Babylonia—is what is presently known as Iraq.[2] Early astrological practices from the region consisted of observing and recording the movement of the planets against the backdrop of the fixed stars.

In his first encyclical letter “Deus Caritas Est” (God is love), Pope Benedict wrote: “Everything has its origin in God's love, everything is shaped by it, everything is directed towards it.” The equivalent of what Benedict says about what God’s love means to Christians was, for the ancient Egyptians, transformation.

 If there was one thing that embodied the concept of the divine for the ancient Egyptian, it was transformation. That a thing can become another thing was the essence of Egyptian magic. The Afterlife books are filled with spells for transforming, for coming into being in other forms. The process of mummification, called beautifying in Egyptian, served to transform the corpse from rotting mortal remains into something of a cult statue, immune from decay, a form which enabled the deceased to live in another way. The natural world was transformed every year by the annual flood of the Nile; without it, there was no life in Egypt. In their understanding of the universe, of nature, and of the divine, everything had its origin in transformation, everything was shaped by it, everything was directed towards it.