Using Astrology

The articles in this section are focused on techniques for interpretation and how those techniques are applied. This includes approaches from different types of astrological practice. It also includes questions that astrologers find themselves confronted with when they select a particular technique.

The author, Georgia Stathis is the owner of Starcycles, a former board member at Kepler College and primary instructor for the Business & Finance Certificate in the Kepler Certificate Program.

Solar Returns are not a new technique.  Firmicus Maternus mentioned Solar Returns in his work. In an article by Maria Mateus regarding Forecasting for the Year, she states,

“In Hellenistic astrology, a study of the current year is a complex undertaking. First, the year is understood within larger time frames, and a series of time lords – planets which govern these time periods – are calculated. Then the two year lords are calculated and subsequently the astrologer continues to calculate the lords responsible for the monthly and daily periods of time within that year. The whole procedure involves a complex array of hierarchically embedded time lords, all purportedly controlling different sized chunks of time.”[1]

Saturn returns to the Saturn/Uranus conjunction of 1988. In this article, Georgia Stathis helps explain how future events in this synodic cycle can be understood by looking at the unfolding of the past.

(Excerpt from the new book: Pushing through Time – available at UAC 2018)

What are Synodic Cycles?

The eight-fold cycle of the Moon is the template for working with Synodic Cycles. This lunar cycle is measured by one conjunction of the Moon with the Sun to the next conjunction of the Moon with the Sun. It is a complete circle of 360º and takes an average of 29 days, 12 hours and 44 minutes. The lunar cycle has eight phases:

Sir Patrick Moore dies at age 89

Chart rectification can be challenging and different astrologers have advocated different methods. In the final class of the certificate, Moving the Chart in Time (W112), students have a chance to test different methods. Corinna Hurst, a student from the Certificate program, has volunteered to share her Week 6 assignment. Corinna started studying at Kepler in the fall of 2010, starting at the beginning with W101 Introduction to Astrological Symbolism and Practice.

Week 6 assignment for W112 Rectification class taught by Carol Tebbs (Fall term 2012-2013)

  • Select a chart of a notable person whose birth time is A, B, or C-rated and experiment with one of the rectification methods described by another author (reviewed in week 1) except Zipporyh Dobyns, Carol Tebbs and Noel Tyl, since we have already practiced their methods. Use a list of important life events to derive a birth time that astrologically corresponds to time rectification, most probably one of especial interest to you. [Note: The other authors included Bernadette Brady, Ciro Discepolo, Laurence Ely, Ken Gilman, David Meadows, Bruce Scofield, and John Willner.]

Kerala

In Kepler's previous academic program, students students compared the Vedic and Western traditions for Horary and Electional astrology.
Kerri Hartnett wrote the following in response to an assignment from faculty member Gary Gomes regarding the Vedic tradition.


Many of Prasnas’s most revered texts originated from the Kerala region of India. This article explores the social, historical and mythological factors that encouraged the development of horary astrology in this part of India. 


The ancient history of Kerala is a bit of a mystery. If we look to mythological evidence, there is legend in India that Parasuram, an incarnation of Lord Vishnu, created Kerala. Legend has it that Parasuram stood on top of a mountain and threw his battle-axe into the sea, commanding it to retreat. The land that emerged from the waters became Kerala.

By Walter Cambra, MA (LAMAFA)

According to the ancients "Via Combusta" exerted a malefic influence, particularly for the Moon in one's natal chart.[1] Via Combusta is Latin for "the burning way" and generally refers to the first fifteen degrees of the sign of Scorpio.[2] Other astrologers have extended Via Combusta to include the last fifteen degrees of the sign of Libra and/or the entire sign of Scorpio.[3]

Modern astrologers have speculated that the negative influence of the signs of Libra and Scorpio, specified as Via Combusta, had its origins in antiquity when many of the malefic fixed stars were located in those two signs.[4]

Jane Austen

The natal chart for British writer Jane Austen shows Virgo (intellect and analysis) rising at the ascendant making Mercury (planet of the mind) her ascendant sign ruler and overall chart ruler (Astrodatabank).

Ms. Austen’s sign-signature is Gemini (mutable-air) which is also ruled by Mercury. Her sign-signature’s mutable “quality” as well as her air “element” suggests inconsistency. The day after accepting a marriage proposal she informed the gentleman that she recanted[*].

Zosma

Zosma, also known as Dhur (“the Lion’s back”), Wadha (“the wise”), or its astronomical name, Delta Leonis, is a star of the constellation Leo. (1) As the fixed stars move at the speed of 1° every 72 years, Zosma currently is at 11°20’ Virgo.

Vivian E. Robson wrote that this star has an impact similar to the combined influences of Venus and Saturn, bringing shame and public lynching followed by some gain or benefit.

Hindu Gods

First of all, it is important to identify Hinduism as a set of religions and beliefs rather than as set orthodox system of beliefs. The current division of sects dates back to the days of Adi Sankara, who organized the Smartist Sect of the Sanatana Dharma, the correct term for Hinduism (also known as the “eternal law”, the “eternal law”) into four primary sects:

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Kalki_Avatar of Visnu. Panjabi manuscript 255

The conception of the soul in Hindu belief is really relevant in connection with God, or Brahman (otherwise known as the reality—the state in which all reality exists). The two principle beliefs are that we are connected to Brahman and have always been connected to Brahman, but simply have forgotten, either because of ignorance or desire, of our divine nature. This is called Advaita Vedanta, and is, as we saw above, practiced by Shaivites and Saktis.

The motivation for the soul’s departure is open to speculation, but some theorize that the soul leaves to experience something in a more limited existence, under the illusion (Maya) that this will make them happy. When the soul attains a body, this triggers other desires because it is in a body. Eventually, over many, many lifetimes, the person gets tired of seeing the same things over and over again and starts wanting to return to Brahman. Either through many (millions) of lifetime or through advanced yogic practices, one ultimately returns to Brahman.

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