Editorials and Opinions

Musings on the philosophical side of astrology, on how astrologers work, books, etc.

We live in the cusp of our World’s arrow of time. This is the time, where our world as we knew it changed. And it keeps changing into another, unfamiliar, energetic, faster pace, connected, yet disconnected, scarier for some, an unpredictable and even uncontrollable time. Some religious people consider these “the end times”. The Mayan calendar pointed to 2012 as the end of the World. I always interpreted this as the “end of the world as we have known it”. The Harmonic Convergence in 1987 also pointed to these times as meaningful. Many today fear how the November 8th election results will bring about a change of our Nation’s destiny.

Kepler MA graduate Maria Mateus has done an excellent job of summarizing the Gauquelin controversy from The Case for Astrology by John Anthony West.

michel_gauquelin"Michel Gauquelin was a graduate in statistics and psychology from the Sorbonne who, together with his wife Francoise, conducted the most significant body of statistical research in astrology to date. While his work does not substantiate some canons of traditional astrology, it conclusively vindicates astrology’s fundamental premise: that there is a relationship between the planets’ positions at the moment of birth and the direction of individual lives."  Click here to read the full article.

"Economists have suffered a collapse in credibility since the global financial crisis began. Faith in the efficiency of markets and the invisible hand is out; 'behavioral economics,' which stresses that humans are fundamentally irrational actors, is in. We are blind to risk; we make decisions on a whim; we prefer consuming now over saving for later. Human fallibility seems to be the perfect explanation for an unfathomable crisis." Foreign Policy Magazine

The Traveling Astrologer's Almanac

Today you may carry a smart phone to help you calculate astrological charts while traveling. “For medieval physicians, the mnemic apparatus of choice was what is sometimes today known as a folding almanac or a belt book. There are thought to be just 29 such almanacs that have survived to the present day.”

The almanac was made using vellum, a tough paper made from an animal skin. It was folded, strung on a cord and hung from the belt. It was particularly useful for doctors as they made house calls.  Read More from The Atlantic.

As we have another eclipse this Sunday, July 11, it seems a good time to consider the Moon's nodes. Astronomically, the nodes are the points where the Moon's orbit around the earth intersects the ecliptic, the apparent path of the Sun (and planets) around the Earth. Whether it is a north or south node is determined by whether the Moon's orbit is has crossed the ecliptic going toward the Northern or Southern Hemisphere. When this intersection of the Moon's orbit and the apparent path of the Sun and planets occurs during a new or full moon, we have an eclipse.

Astrologically, there are different schools of thought with regard to interpretation of the nodes. In general, traditional astrology treated the South node as malefic and the north node as tentatively benefic. Vedic astrologers in India do not like either one. Here are some early interpretations:

Charlie Hebdo 2015

The dramatic week of the terrorist attacks in Paris on the Charlie Hebdo offices and the Kosher grocery store, Jan. 7-15, 2015, closely coincided with eight days during which Mercury and Venus were in a Planetary War, with Venus (planet of politics) winning over Mercury (planet of speech) due to its superior brightness. This Planetary War ran from Thurs. Jan. 8th at 4:23 am (Paris time) to Jan. 15th at 2:56 pm – the day the first issue of Charlie Hebdo was released since the office shooting.  At mid-day Jan. 7th tr. Mercury and Venus were within 1 degree 10 minutes of arc of each other.  Coincidentally, one of the two Charlie Hebdo terrorists, Cherif Kouachi, had natal Mercury and Venus in a Planetary War. He was in Rahu-Mercury Dasha in January 2015.

Critics of astrology often argue that "astrologers," a loosely defined group that includes dabblers, serious students, and practicing astrologers, are uniformed in regard to the existence of two zodiacs.

They may be right about the first group, but certainly not about the second and third. For the past 40 years, at least, most serious astrology books have drawn attention to the tropical-sidereal debate when the topic of the zodiac is discussed. There is no excuse for anyone who considers themselves an "astrologer" today to be ignorant of the existence of this complex issue.

However, exactly what are the differences between each zodiac, expecially in regard to symbolic delineation purposes, is a topic that has not been adequately addressed. And so we are still left with a deep and unresolved controversy that haunts our field of study.

Depiction of the 12-letter Alphabet

The Twelve Letter Alphabet, sometimes called the twelve “Archetypes,” underlies much of the presentation of planets, signs, and houses in modern Western astrology.  In my view, this has led to the distortion of much of astrology’s fundamental symbolism. Many other astrologers have come to the same conclusion, yet this system persists.
This article, the result of many years of frustration with the conventional presentation of astrology, has as its goal that astrologers question their explicit and implicit use of the Twelve Letter Alphabet.   A case can be made for putting this system away forever, and I attempt to make that case here.  For newer students I’d like this article to be a “patch” to decrease their confusion and help them think things through when they encounter different versions of astrological symbolism.  For more experienced astrologers and astrology teachers, I would like to stimulate some long-overdue conversation.

Robert Glasscock's special 3-Hour workshop on "Solar Arcs: What They Are – How to Use Them" presented for Kepler College on November 4, 2017 stirred interest and even controversy from illustrating solar arc techniques in Donald Trump's and the United States' horoscopes. Additional information, including dates for specific midpoints with a description from Ebertine's book "The Combination of Stellar Influences," is listed in a previous article. In this article, Robert continues to track his Solar Arc predictions and current events.

Many astrologers are daunted by the challenges of mundane astrology (the astrology of world affairs, politics, economies, world figures and their influence). But learning to read such horoscopes is an excellent method of refining one's predictive abilities. Call it Probability Assessment. 

Reading "mundane" charts is also an excellent arena for learning to read objectively, since the temptation is always to read through the lens of one's political biases, party affiliation, etc. Will a liberal astrologer interpret a chart differently than a conservative one?

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