Judith HillJudith Hill is an award-winning author of thirteen books including the classics: Medical Astrology, A Guide to Planetary Pathology; The Astrological Body Types, and Vocational Astrology (winner of the 1999 American Federation of Astrologers, Inc. “Best Book Award”. She produces The Renaissance Medicine Conference and created the course Medical Astrology 101. Hill was possibly the first to introduce Western Medical Astrology to Szechuan, China. 

Judith is a Chartered Herbalist with Dominion Herbal College. She documented the natal and transit health influences of the Lunar Nodes; and the medical impact of eclipses by sign and conjunct natal planets. She created the first polarity based nodal eclipse calendar. She has recently published Medical Astrology for Health Practitioners; and Medical Astrology in Action. Judith is also a teacher at The Matthew Wood Institute of Herbalism and at Kepler College. 

An internationally recognized researcher, Judith internationally published significant statistical research on astro-genetics and astro-seismology and has served as the Educational Director for the San Francisco NCGR.  and as the private assistant to the great physicist Arthur Young at The Institute of the Study of Consciousness. 

Judith successfully matched 5 biographies to 5 natal charts in an NCGR sponsored skeptic’s challenge in 1989. She is one of the longest practicing, full-time astrological consultants in the world. You can find out more at her Website: https://JudithHillAstrology.com

Her recommended texts:
Medical Astrology: A Guide to Planetary Pathology by Judith Hill.
For the medical practitioners: Medical Astrology for Health Practitioners by Judith Hill


Kepler Instructors are chosen for their expertise in academic and astrological knowledge and for their ability to effectively teach what they know to others in an online environment.

They must be able to produce quality instructional materials that enhance learning by using multiple strategies and approaches. They need to understand how to work with students remotely, and to develop the trust and respect of their students and colleagues.

They also need to stay up-to-date on new developments and examine the interplay of the new and old. And they must be willing acknowledge their own biases so they can present their students with multiple perspectives.