Traditional astrology offers a particularly effective system of forecasting that combines techniques to help you prepare for the future and understand the past.

DATE: Begins May 6, 2018 (5 weeks)
TIME: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM PDT / 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM EDT

This system is known as the Cycle or Turning of the Year. Instead of just using a Solar Return, this method was prepared yearly for each birthday. It has its roots in Hellenistic astrology, came to full flower in the Arabic and Persian eras, and persisted through the late Classical period of Lilly and his contemporaries. Ben Dykes' translation of Abu Mashar's On Solar Revolutions in Persian Nativities 3 is a full exposition of this system.

Why use Essential Dignities? Because they are a crucial part of good interpretation.This is especially true is you want to work with forecasting (particularly horary and electional astrology). 

By Walter Cambra, MA (LAMAFA)

According to the ancients "Via Combusta" exerted a malefic influence, particularly for the Moon in one's natal chart.[1] Via Combusta is Latin for "the burning way" and generally refers to the first fifteen degrees of the sign of Scorpio.[2] Other astrologers have extended Via Combusta to include the last fifteen degrees of the sign of Libra and/or the entire sign of Scorpio.[3]

Modern astrologers have speculated that the negative influence of the signs of Libra and Scorpio, specified as Via Combusta, had its origins in antiquity when many of the malefic fixed stars were located in those two signs.[4]

Sometimes it is easy to forget that the great books of literature are riddled with astrological references. Contrasting views about astrological fate are important in understanding the interactions of characters in Shakespeare's play, King Lear. The older characters place great stock in the influence of the stars on human affairs, while the younger characters mock these superstitious beliefs. The viewpoints in the play mirror the attitudes and arguments about astrology that were taking place in the 1600's.  This article was written by Carol Tebbs (Kepler faculty), Rhonda Busby (graduate), Kathy Kipp (when she was a senior)